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The Yamaha Disklavier Education Network

Latest news, tips and musings from Disklavier professionals.

Overcoming Distances with Disklavier ENSPIRE

Overcoming Distances with Disklavier ENSPIRE

 Reported by Cornelius Moussong, Yamaha Music Europe YAMAHA Disklavier ENSPIRE is famous for its versatile recording and playback capabilities. The instrument is not only well-known for its entertainment, but is also a valuable teaching tool highly appreciated by institutions, professors and students in an educational setting. One particular f...
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Just another beautiful #multimedia work with a Disklavier...

Just another beautiful #multimedia work with a Disklavier...
Clarinetist Remi Le Taillandier has released a set of three original works for clarinet and Disklavier, plus interactive multimedia. Programmed in Max/MSP environment, his clarinet playing controls both the Disklavier and the light show, and the result is mesmerizing! Click the image to hear all three performances and subscribe over at Remi's YouTube channel!

A Disklavier Jam in an Ancient Plaza

A Disklavier Jam in an Ancient Plaza
In October 2020, German keyboard artist Tobias Schmitz (also known as EINS) performed a uniquely modern, socially distant musical happening centered around the connectivity of the Disklavier. The location, Trier's Porta Nigra, is the largest remaining Roman structure (built circa 170 AD) north of the Alps. Click the image to hear the performance on YouTube!

University of Oregon Takes Disklavier for a Spin

Pianist Alexandre Dossin and the students at the University of Oregon School of Music and Dance have partnered with Classic Pianos to arrange the use of a Disklavier in the 2020 Spring semester. Before school was closed due to the pandemic, Dossin experience long-distance teaching, as he instructed students at Brigham Young University via the Disklavier Remote Lesson feature.Alexandre Dossin Teaches a BYU Student via Remote Lesson on Diskalvier
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Gershwin Plays Cincinnati

Gershwin Plays Cincinnati
(L-R) Peter Phillips, Louis Langrée, and Dr. Stella Sick
(from the Yamaha MusicUSA blog)Thanks to longitme DEN enthusiast (DEN-thusiast?) Stella Sick, The Cincinnati Orchestra, and Australian piano roll enthusiast and digital music engineer Peter Phillips, George Gershwin appeared in a posthoumous performance earlier this year. This is no ghost story. Rather, it’s a tale of technology.Gershwin’s piano part had actually been recorded in 1924 on piano rolls for the then-popular Duo-Art reproducing piano. Phillips converted the performance to MIDI data, using a machine he built himself, for other live performance projects way back in 2013.  It sounds relatively simple, but in fact it was extremely challenging and labor-intensive to reproduce Gershwin’s part accurately and to make it possible for the conductor, Louis Langrée, and the orchestra to follow along with it. Check out the full story on the YamahaUSA Blog! 

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