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Shana Kirk

Shana Kirk

Shana Kirk is a pianist, teacher, technology consultant, and arts advocate in Denver, CO. Focusing on teaching and performing technologies, she presents performances and workshops at music and music education events and conferences nationwide. She is also a frequent contributor to publications such as American Music Teacher and Clavier Companion.

Yamaha's My Music Recorder iOS app has been around for several years, providing a cute and handy way for students, teachers, and parents to keep a video record of practicing, as well as share achievements on YouTube. Now, a hidden feature will also allow Disklavier (E3 and Enspire only) users to create and play back VIDEO SYNC performances without the cumbersome tether of audio cables! Here's how it works:

1. Connect a MD-BT01 or UD-BT01 Bluetooth MIDI adapter to the MIDI jacks of your Disklavier. (For E3, don't forget to select the MIDI input/output you are using: MIDI or USB)
2. Launch the My Music Recorder App
3. Click the gear wheel icon to connect Bluetooth (you'll get a reminder if you do not already have Bluetooth enabled on your device)

Here's a tweet from our friends at Yamaha Canada to show how it works!



Composer, performer, and music theorist George E. Lewis recently joined Kennedy Center Artistic Director for Jazz Jason Moran in a special performance celebrating the 35th anniversary of the MacArthur Fellows program. Lewis and Moran are both past MacArthur Fellows, named in 2002 and 2010, respectively. In discussing the work, Lewis detailed the setup of the one-of-a-kind performance, enthusiastically drawing on his 25-year history with the Disklavier, calling it a "reliable instrument, great instrument, great sound." 

Later in the discussion, Lewis makes analogies between musical artificial intelligence and computer-controlled anti-lock brake systems or even the Mars Rover, driving the point that there are many parallels between musical interaction and the operations of the everyday world. 

The work, essentially an improvised chamber piece for piano, trombone, and computer-controlled Disklavier, incorporates electronic elements, namely a degree of artificial intelligence, without any electronic sounds. The computer programming "listens" for musical elements via audio of the live players, then interprets them and interacts via the Disklavier. 

In addition to creating the Voyager interactive music performance software used in this performance, George Lewis is the author of The Oxford Handbook of Critical Improvisation Studies, a two-volume work that examines the process of improvisation both in and out of the arts. 

In a pinnacle event for Yamaha's Disklavier-based Remote Lesson technology, Maestro Byron Janis has conducted a long distance masterclass from Yamaha Artist Services in New York City, with students of the Moscow Conservatory. The event took place Sep. 28, 2016.
Posted by on in Disklavier Center Stage
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West Hartford, Conn. (PRWEB) September 19, 2016

University of Hartford's The Hartt School has selected a Yamaha Disklavier CFX concert grand piano (DCFX) for its soon to be renovated Millard Auditorium. The award-winning reproducing piano will be permanently housed at Millard, one of the university's primary concert venues, to amplify student learning via master classes and distance learning.
Posted by on in The Disklavier Frontier
Pianist Daniel Koppelman plays a Disklavier connected with Gestural, a program authored by composer Christopher Dobrian to interact improvisationally with a live performer. The list of composers, arrangers, and multimedia artists using Disklavier in their work today is this century's A-list of innovators in music-making: David Rosemboom. Tod Machover. Steve Horowitz. Kyle Gann. Eve Egoyan. JB Floyd. Christopher Dobrian. Robert Black. Xiao Xiao. SO MANY others. With this list growing by the minute, we would like to carve some space here at the DEN to explore some of the many ways today's musical creators have put our favorite instrument to work, sometimes testing its limits.